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"One of the coolest quotes that I've come across on High Noon Kahuna's debut album Killing Spree came from Philly deathsludge entity / underground commentator Rot Coven, who described the music on Spree as an 'utterly baffling blend of '70s proto-metal, Black Flag / Bl'ast-ish hardcore punk, kaleidoscopic psychedelia, and what sounds like some kind of heavily amplified surf music (which kept making me think of the weird surfy parts of Agent Orange for whatever that's worth to anyone)... like some acid-damaged mid-'80s Arizona band that would have played shows with JFA, Mighty Sphincter, and the Sun City Girls.' Man, I could not have put it better myself. That comment was probably the most astute assessment of the band's 2023 disc I've read. The band and that album were (and are) most definitely weird, totally ignoring any semblance of genre guardrails for an explosive riot of melody and heaviness, chaos and musical proficiency, and most importantly, hammering riffage and serious earworm material. High Noon Kahuna traverse those hinterlands between noise rock, hardcore punk, sludgy metallic crunch, surf guitar flourishes and Morricone-esque atmosphere, and wild-eyed, spaced-out psychedelic adventure, where it all bleeds and blurs together into something that is just as unique as their name demands. It's the result of a shared background in the DMV underground that goes back decades; between guitarist Tim Otis (Admiral Browning), drummer Brian Goad (Internal Void / The Larrys / Nagato), and bassist / singer Paul Cogle (Black Blizzard / Vox Populi / Nagato / Slagstorm), each member of the trio has left enduring fingerprints on much of what has been going on in the outer fringes of the DC suburbs for nearly forty years."That uniqueness takes on a darker cast with their sophomore album This Place Is Haunted, their second release with Crucial Blast. Recorded with Kevin Bernsten at Developing Nations, Haunted's mix of burly, noisy rock and mysterious texture work in tandem to evoke the ectoplasmic shadows of the title. Visions of spirit boards and swirling motes of dust above a long-past séance. Ecteneic forces and shaking tables. A door opens. And something looms over High Noon Kahuna's peculiar, punchy songwriting and wigged-out soundscapery. The twelve songs on Haunted wind through a phantasmal labyrinth of odd noise, roaring anthemic hooks, stretched-out stratospheric psych, eerie layered melody, and moments of dark, doom-laden heaviness. Peers into darker corners." -Crucial Blast
"One of the coolest quotes that I've come across on High Noon Kahuna's debut album Killing Spree came from Philly deathsludge entity / underground commentator Rot Coven, who described the music on Spree as an 'utterly baffling blend of '70s proto-metal, Black Flag / Bl'ast-ish hardcore punk, kaleidoscopic psychedelia, and what sounds like some kind of heavily amplified surf music (which kept making me think of the weird surfy parts of Agent Orange for whatever that's worth to anyone)... like some acid-damaged mid-'80s Arizona band that would have played shows with JFA, Mighty Sphincter, and the Sun City Girls.' Man, I could not have put it better myself. That comment was probably the most astute assessment of the band's 2023 disc I've read. The band and that album were (and are) most definitely weird, totally ignoring any semblance of genre guardrails for an explosive riot of melody and heaviness, chaos and musical proficiency, and most importantly, hammering riffage and serious earworm material. High Noon Kahuna traverse those hinterlands between noise rock, hardcore punk, sludgy metallic crunch, surf guitar flourishes and Morricone-esque atmosphere, and wild-eyed, spaced-out psychedelic adventure, where it all bleeds and blurs together into something that is just as unique as their name demands. It's the result of a shared background in the DMV underground that goes back decades; between guitarist Tim Otis (Admiral Browning), drummer Brian Goad (Internal Void / The Larrys / Nagato), and bassist / singer Paul Cogle (Black Blizzard / Vox Populi / Nagato / Slagstorm), each member of the trio has left enduring fingerprints on much of what has been going on in the outer fringes of the DC suburbs for nearly forty years."That uniqueness takes on a darker cast with their sophomore album This Place Is Haunted, their second release with Crucial Blast. Recorded with Kevin Bernsten at Developing Nations, Haunted's mix of burly, noisy rock and mysterious texture work in tandem to evoke the ectoplasmic shadows of the title. Visions of spirit boards and swirling motes of dust above a long-past séance. Ecteneic forces and shaking tables. A door opens. And something looms over High Noon Kahuna's peculiar, punchy songwriting and wigged-out soundscapery. The twelve songs on Haunted wind through a phantasmal labyrinth of odd noise, roaring anthemic hooks, stretched-out stratospheric psych, eerie layered melody, and moments of dark, doom-laden heaviness. Peers into darker corners." -Crucial Blast
657628444954
This Place Is Haunted
Artist: High Noon Kahuna
Format: CD
New: Available $15.98
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Formats and Editions

DISC: 1

1. Track 1
2. Atomic Sunset
3. Track 3
4. Lamborghini
5. Track 5
6. Prehistoric Love Letter
7. Track 7
8. Good Night God Bless
9. Track 9
10. The Devil's Lettuce
11. Track 11
12. Brand New Day
13. Track 13
14. Midnight Moon
15. Track 15
16. Sidewalk Assassin
17. Track 17
18. Mystical Shit 1
19. 1
20. Tumbleweed Nightmare 1
21. 1
22. Flaming Dagger 1
23. 1
24. Et Ita Factum Est

More Info:

"One of the coolest quotes that I've come across on High Noon Kahuna's debut album Killing Spree came from Philly deathsludge entity / underground commentator Rot Coven, who described the music on Spree as an 'utterly baffling blend of '70s proto-metal, Black Flag / Bl'ast-ish hardcore punk, kaleidoscopic psychedelia, and what sounds like some kind of heavily amplified surf music (which kept making me think of the weird surfy parts of Agent Orange for whatever that's worth to anyone)... like some acid-damaged mid-'80s Arizona band that would have played shows with JFA, Mighty Sphincter, and the Sun City Girls.' Man, I could not have put it better myself. That comment was probably the most astute assessment of the band's 2023 disc I've read. The band and that album were (and are) most definitely weird, totally ignoring any semblance of genre guardrails for an explosive riot of melody and heaviness, chaos and musical proficiency, and most importantly, hammering riffage and serious earworm material. High Noon Kahuna traverse those hinterlands between noise rock, hardcore punk, sludgy metallic crunch, surf guitar flourishes and Morricone-esque atmosphere, and wild-eyed, spaced-out psychedelic adventure, where it all bleeds and blurs together into something that is just as unique as their name demands. It's the result of a shared background in the DMV underground that goes back decades; between guitarist Tim Otis (Admiral Browning), drummer Brian Goad (Internal Void / The Larrys / Nagato), and bassist / singer Paul Cogle (Black Blizzard / Vox Populi / Nagato / Slagstorm), each member of the trio has left enduring fingerprints on much of what has been going on in the outer fringes of the DC suburbs for nearly forty years."That uniqueness takes on a darker cast with their sophomore album This Place Is Haunted, their second release with Crucial Blast. Recorded with Kevin Bernsten at Developing Nations, Haunted's mix of burly, noisy rock and mysterious texture work in tandem to evoke the ectoplasmic shadows of the title. Visions of spirit boards and swirling motes of dust above a long-past séance. Ecteneic forces and shaking tables. A door opens. And something looms over High Noon Kahuna's peculiar, punchy songwriting and wigged-out soundscapery. The twelve songs on Haunted wind through a phantasmal labyrinth of odd noise, roaring anthemic hooks, stretched-out stratospheric psych, eerie layered melody, and moments of dark, doom-laden heaviness. Peers into darker corners." -Crucial Blast
        
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